Push Boats

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CSS Albemarle

Twin screw towboat, b. 2008 by B&B Boatbuilders, Inc., Bayou la Batre, Ala. 74 x 30.  Cummins KTA38-M1 diesels, 2000 hp.  Twin Disc red.  6.39:1. Operated by Carline's Geismar Fleet, Inc., Gonzales, La.

OFFICIAL #:
1217265
HOME PORT:
NEW ORLEANS, LA
OWNED BY:
Albemarle LLC
ON CHARTER BY:
N/A
CALL SIGN:
WDE7060
FRN #:
0006607519
LICENSE ID#:
L00514145
MMSI #:
367388450
YEAR BUILT:
2008
ENGINE TYPE:
(2) KTA 38 M
MFG. HP RATING:
2000
RIVERMAN'S HP RATING:
2000
REDUCTION GEAR RATIO:
6.39:1
REPOWERED:
N/A
FUEL CAPACITY:
24,000 GAL
GROSS TONS:
133
NET TONS:
107
LENGTH:
74
BREADTH:
30
DEPTH:
9
OPERATING CREW:
2 - 6

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CSS Albemarle, a relatively small ironclad ram, was built at Edwards Ferry, North Carolina. Commissioned in April 1864 under the command of Commander J.W. Cooke , CSN, she almost immediately went into action. On 19 April 1864, Albemarle attacked U.S. ships off Plymouth, N.C., sinking USS Southfield and driving away USS Miami and two other gunboats. With their waterborne communications severed, the Union forces were forced to surrender Plymouth to the Confederates.

Just over two weeks later, on 5 May, Albemarle , accompanied by the steamers Cotton Plant and Bombshell , steamed out into the North Carolina Sounds and attacked another U.S. Navy force, consisting of the "Double-ender" gunboats Sassacus , Wyalusing and Mattabesett , converted ferryboat Commodore Hull and small gunboat Ceres . Though Sassacus made a valiant attempt to sink the Albemarle by ramming, she was badly damaged in return. The Confederate ironclad was but lightly damaged in the engagement, which threatened the entire Union position on North Carolina's internal waters.

Desperate circumstances yield desperate responses, and on the night of 27-28 October 1864, Lieutenant William B. Cushing , USN, took the torpedo boat Picket Boat Number One upriver to Plymouth and bravely attacked Albemarle at her berth, sinking her with a spar torpedo. Following the Union recapture of the town, Albemarle was refloated. Taken to the Norfolk Navy Yard in April 1865, she remained there until sold in October 1867. 


CSS Arkansas

Twin screw towboat, b. 1981 by Louis G. Ortis Boat Co., Krotz Springs, La. 60 x 24.1.  Cummins KTA19-M3 diesels, repowered 2005,  1200 hp.  Twin Disc red. 6:1. Orig. CAPT. TRAC, owned by St. Pierre & Sons marine, Inc., Cut Off, La.  Renamed HARBO when leased Aug. 1984 - 1986 by Arkansas River Co., Greenville.  Sold 1988, renamed by Carline's Geismar Fleet, Inc., Gonzales, La.

OFFICIAL #:
632638
HOME PORT:
NEW ORLEANS, LA
OWNED BY:
CSSA
ON CHARTER BY:
N/A
CALL SIGN:
WDC3181
FRN #:
0006607519
LICENSE ID#:
L00514145
MMSI #:
367003580
YEAR BUILT:
1981
ENGINE TYPE:
(2) KTA 19 M 3
MFG. HP RATING:
1200
RIVERMAN'S HP RATING:
1200
REDUCTION GEAR RATIO:
6:1
REPOWERED:
2005
FUEL CAPACITY:
13,060 GAL
GROSS TONS:
129
NET TONS:
87
LENGTH:
55.8
BREADTH:
24.1
DEPTH:
9.2
OPERATING CREW:
2 - 6

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CSS Arkansas , an ironclad ram, was built at Memphis, Tennessee, in 1861-62. Incomplete when Union forces closed in on Memphis in May 1862, she was towed up the Yazoo River to Yazoo City, Mississippi, and finished as far as circumstances allowed. On 15 July 1862, her enterprising commanding officer, Lieutenant Isaac Newton Brown , CSN, took Arkansas down the Yazoo, where she encountered the U.S. gunboats Carondelet and Tyler and the ram Queen of the West , leaving the first two badly damaged. Continuing out into the Mississippi River, she boldly fought her way through the assembled Federal fleet and came to rest under the protection of the Confederate fortress at Vicksburg. While at Vicksburg on 22 July, Arkansas was attacked by the Queen of the West and ironclad Essex , but was not severely damaged. Though badly in need of repairs, she was next ordered to steam down the river to assist Confederate forces in an attack on Baton Rouge, Louisiana. While carrying out this mission on 6 August 1862, CSS Arkansas suffered a severe machinery breakdown during an engagement with the Essex , drifted ashore and was burned to prevent capture. 


CSS Atlanta

Triple screw towboat, b. 1981 by Sidney Henry Boat Builders, Morgan City, La. 65 x 26.  Cummins KTA19-M3 diesels, repowered 2005, 1590 hp. Twin Disc red. Orig. JENNIFER D, owned by D&G Boat Rentals, Morgan City.  Sold 1983, renamed by Carline's Geismar Fleet, Inc., Gonzales, La.

OFFICIAL #:
647194
HOME PORT:
BATON ROUGE, LA
OWNED BY:
CSSA
ON CHARTER BY:
N/A
CALL SIGN:
WDC 3182
FRN #:
0006607519
LICENSE ID#:
L00514145
MMSI #:
367003590
YEAR BUILT:
1982
ENGINE TYPE:
(3) KTA 19 M
MFG. HP RATING:
1590
RIVERMAN'S HP RATING:
1600
REDUCTION GEAR RATIO:
6:1
REPOWERED:
2012
FUEL CAPACITY:
13,500 GAL
GROSS TONS:
143
NET TONS:
97
LENGTH:
61
BREADTH:
26
DEPTH:
8.2
OPERATING CREW:
2 - 6

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CSS Atlanta , an 1006-ton ironclad ram, was originally built in Scotland in 1861 as the merchant steamship Fingal . In November 1861 she ran the blockade into Savannah, Georgia, with a large cargo of weapons and military supplies. After Union forces closed the exits from Savannah, preventing her further use as a blockade runner, Fingal was converted to an casemate ironclad and renamed Atlanta . She made her first appearance as a Confederate warship in mid-1862.

Atlanta made two efforts to attack Federal warships blockading the coast and rivers leading to Savannah. The first, in early 1863, was thwarted by obstructions blocking the route to the sea. In June 1863 Atlanta made her second attempt, targeting blockaders in Wassau Sound. There, on the 17th, she encountered the U.S. Navy monitors Nahant and Weehawken . In a brief battle, Atlanta went aground and was overwhelmed by Weehawken 's superior firepower, forcing her to surrender.

The captured ironclad was taken into the Union Navy as USS Atlanta , commissioning for service in February 1864. She was stationed on the James River, Virginia, to support the operations of the army under General Grant. On 21 May 1864, she fired on Confederate cavalry that were attacking Fort Powhatan. A year later, with the Civil War over, Atlanta went north and decommissioned at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in June 1865. After several years "in ordinary", she was sold in May 1869. Reportedly, she subsequently became the Haitian warship Triumph and disappeared at sea off Cape Hatteras in December 1869. 


CSS Chicora

Twin screw towboat, b. 1981 by Balehi Marine, Inc., Lacombe, La. 56 x 22.  Cummins KTA19-M3 diesels, repowered 2006, 1200 hp.  Twin Disc red. Orig. MARGARET B. MONTEIRO, owned by Aries Boat Co., Houma, La.  Sold 1989, renamed by Carline's Geismar Fleet, Inc., Gonzales, La.

OFFICIAL #:
631835
HOME PORT:
NEW ORLEANS, LA
OWNED BY:
PPF
ON CHARTER BY:
N/A
CALL SIGN:
WDC 3183
FRN #:
0006607519
LICENSE ID#:
L00514145
MMSI #:
367003610
YEAR BUILT:
1981
ENGINE TYPE:
(2) KTA 19 M 3
MFG. HP RATING:
1200
RIVERMAN'S HP RATING:
1200
REDUCTION GEAR RATIO:
5:1
REPOWERED:
2006
FUEL CAPACITY:
11,239 GAL
GROSS TONS:
85
NET TONS:
58
LENGTH:
53.2
BREADTH:
22.1
DEPTH:
7.6
OPERATING CREW:
2 -3

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CSS Chicora, a Richmond class ironclad ram, was built at Charleston, South Carolina. Commissioned in November 1862 under the command of Confederate Navy Commander John Randolph Tucker, she was employed in the defense of Charleston for most of the rest of the Civil War.

In her first major action, on 31 January 1863, Chicora and her sister ship Palmetto State attacked the U.S. Navy blockading force off Charleston. They disabled the gunboats Keystone State and Mercedita, forcing the latter to briefly surrender, and engaged other Union warships before returning safely to port. On 7 April 1863, when U.S. Navy ironclads attacked Fort Sumter, and later in the year when other fortifications were assaulted, Chicora operated in defense of the Confederate positions. She also furnished the initial crewmen for the submarine torpedo boat H.L. Hunley, five of whom were drowned when the submarine accidently sank on 29 August 1863. CSS Chicora remained active until 18 February 1865, when she was destroyed to prevent capture when Charleston was evacuated.


CSS Palmetto State

Twin screw towboat, b. 1979 by Louis G. Ortis Boat Co., Krotz Springs, La.  55 x 22.  Cummins KTA19 diesels, repowered 2006, 1000 hp.  Twin Disc red. 6:1. Orig. ANNETTE PIZANI, owned by Lamans Towing, Inc., Marrero, La.  Sold 1986, renamed KATHY RICHOUX by I.C.W., Inc., Lockport, La. Transferred to WAR Marine, Inc., Lockport.  Sold 1989, renamed by Carline's Geismar Fleet, Inc., Gonzales, La.

OFFICIAL #:
611668
HOME PORT:
NEW ORLEANS, LA
OWNED BY:
PPF
ON CHARTER BY:
N/A
CALL SIGN:
WDC3073
FRN #:
0006607519
LICENSE ID#:
L00514145
MMSI #:
367002270
YEAR BUILT:
1979
ENGINE TYPE:
(2) KTA 19 M
MFG. HP RATING:
1000
RIVERMAN'S HP RATING:
1000
REDUCTION GEAR RATIO:
6:1
REPOWERED:
Jan-00
FUEL CAPACITY:
10,000 GAL
GROSS TONS:
96
NET TONS:
65
LENGTH:
51.8
BREADTH:
22.1
DEPTH:
8.3
OPERATING CREW:
2 - 6

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CSS Palmetto State, a Richmond class ironclad ram built at Charleston, South Carolina, was commissioned in September 1862. On 31 January 1863, in one of the Confederate Navy's few successful efforts against Union blockading forces, she joined her sister ship Chicora in an attack that disabled USS Keystone State and USS Mercedita. Though the blockade was not broken, it was clearly endangered by the two Confederate ironclads, neither of which was much injured in the action.

When U.S. Navy ironclads attacked Fort Sumter on 7 April 1863, and when some of Charleston's defending batteries had to be evacuated on 6-7 September of that year, Palmetto State assisted in the successful Confederate operations. For most of the rest of the Civil War, she remained active in the Charleston vicinity. CSS Palmetto State was destroyed on 18 February 1865, when the city was evacuated.


CSS Richmond

Twin screw towboat, b. 1965 by Carline & Sons, Plaquemine, La.  56 x 24.  Cummins KTA19 diesels, 1000 hp.  Twin Disc red.  Orig. E. J. CARLINE NO. 1, renamed CINDY CARLINE in 1974, present name in 1991.  Owned by Carline's Geismar Fleet, Inc., Gonzales, La.

OFFICIAL #:
297321
HOME PORT:
BATON ROUGE, LA
OWNED BY:
CGF
ON CHARTER BY:
N/A
CALL SIGN:
WDC3231
FRN #:
0006607519
LICENSE ID#:
L00514145
MMSI #:
367004280
YEAR BUILT:
1964
ENGINE TYPE:
(2) KT 19 M
MFG. HP RATING:
850
RIVERMAN'S HP RATING:
850
REDUCTION GEAR RATIO:
5:1
REPOWERED:
1996
FUEL CAPACITY:
16,000 GAL
GROSS TONS:
87
NET TONS:
56
LENGTH:
54.5
BREADTH:
22
DEPTH:
8
OPERATING CREW:
2 - 3

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CSS Richmond, first of a class of six ironclad rams, was built at the Norfolk Navy Yard. Launched in early May 1862, as the Confederates prepared to evacuate the Norfolk area, she was towed up the James River to Richmond, Virginia, and completed there in July. She thereafter served in the James River Squadron, protecting the Confederacy's capital city from waterborne assault.

Richmond's combat activity mainly took place from mid-1864 into early 1865, as General Grant's Federal army pushed south to and over the James. On 13 August 1864, she bombarded Union positions at Dutch Gap in an effort to cover the movements of Confederate troops. From 29 September to 1 October, her guns supported an attack on the Federal army's Fort Harrison and protected Southern-held Chaffin's Bluff. On 22 October, while near Chaffin's Bluff, Richmond was engaged by enemy shore-based artillery.

Her final action took place on 23-24 January 1865, as the James River Squadron attempted to force its way past the obstructions at Trent's Reach to attack Federal bases below. During the passage Richmond went aground and came under heavy fire from guns ashore and from the U.S. Navy monitor Onondaga. Though some of the supporting unarmored vessels were destroyed or severely damaged in the unsuccessful operation, Richmond and the Squadron's other two ironclads were able to disengage and retreat back up the river. To prevent capture she was deliberately destroyed by burning on 3 April 1865, as the Confederate Government prepared to abandon Richmond.


CSS Savannah

Twin screw towboat, b. 2004 by Hope Services, Inc., Dulac, La. 72 x 30.  Cummins KTA38-MO diesels, 1700 hp.  Twin Disc red.  6.39:1.  Operated by Carline's Geismar Fleet, Inc., Gonzales, La.

OFFICIAL #:
1163281
HOME PORT:
HOUMA, LA
OWNED BY:
CSSS
ON CHARTER BY:
N/A
CALL SIGN:
WDC3232
FRN #:
0006607519
LICENSE ID#:
L00514145
MMSI #:
367004290
YEAR BUILT:
2004
ENGINE TYPE:
(2) KTA 38 CUMMINS
MFG. HP RATING:
1700
RIVERMAN'S HP RATING:
1700
REDUCTION GEAR RATIO:
6.39:1
REPOWERED:
2011
FUEL CAPACITY:
19,000 GAL
GROSS TONS:
144
NET TONS:
115
LENGTH:
72
BREADTH:
30
DEPTH:
10
OPERATING CREW:
2 - 6

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CSS Savannah , a Richmond class ironclad ram, was constructed by F. Willink at the Savannah Shipyards. Its iron plates were manufactured in Atlanta, then transported to Savannah, where they were cut, drilled, and mounted. With a length of 172.5 feet, a 34-foot beam, and a 12.5-foot draft, the Savannah featured a conventional hull and casement with single screw, with 4 inches of iron armor over 22 inches of wood.

 The Savannah 's armament included two 7-inch rifled cannons and two 6.4-inch Brooks guns. The engines, built in Columbus, were significantly underpowered. Although considered among the best ships built by the Confederacy, the Savannah boasted an estimated top speed of only six knots. It took almost thirty minutes to make a 180-degree turn. The crew consisted of 180 officers and men.

 Launched on February 4, 1863, the ironclad Savannah was transferred in June to naval forces under Flag Officer William Hunter on the Savannah River. The ship remained on the river and did not engage in battle until Union general William T. Sherman approached the city of Savannah in December 1864, at the end of his march to the sea. Unable to prevent the city's capture, the Savannah remained on the river for two days to protect William J. Hardee's withdrawal across an improvised pontoon bridge, built with the help of the Savannah's crew.

On December 20, 1864, the ironclad engaged in a spirited daylong artillery duel with Union guns, becoming the last ship of the Confederacy to fight in Georgia waters. When the Savannah attempted to escape, the ship was trapped by the South's own torpedo mines, leaving it a "trapped lion," in the words of General Sherman. On December 21 Tattnall ordered the Savannah to be burned to prevent capture. The ironclad was run aground on the South Carolina shore and set afire. The ensuing explosion was reported to have lit up the night sky for miles.

 

CSS Texas

Twin screw towboat, b. 2011 by Gulf Coast Steel, Inc., Bayou la Batre, Ala(HULL). And Carline Management Co.(FINISH OUT) 75 x 30. Cummins KTA38-M diesels, 2000 hp. Twin Disc 5321 red. 6.39:1. Operated by Carline Management Company, Inc., Gonzales, La.

OFFICIAL #:
1236489
HOME PORT:
NEW ORLEANS, LA
OWNED BY:
CSS Texas LLC
ON CHARTER BY:
N/A
CALL SIGN:
WDG2121
FRN #:
0006607519
LICENSE ID#:
L00514145
MMSI #:
367512340
YEAR BUILT:
2011
ENGINE TYPE:
(2) KTA 38 M
MFG. HP RATING:
2000
RIVERMAN'S HP RATING:
2000
REDUCTION GEAR RATIO:
6.39:1
REPOWERED:
N/A
FUEL CAPACITY:
24,000 GAL
GROSS TONS:
137
NET TONS:
109
LENGTH:
75
BREADTH:
30
DEPTH:
9
OPERATING CREW:
2 - 6

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CSS Texas (1865)
The keel for the CSS Texas was laid down at Richmond, Virginia. She was launched in January 1865. At the time of Robert E. Lee's evacuation of Richmond on 3 April 1865, she was left unfinished but intact in an outfitting berth at the Richmond Navy Yard, one of only two vessels which escaped destruction by the departing Confederate forces. Captured when the city fell the following day, the ironclad was taken into the United States Navy, but saw no service.


CSS Tennessee

Twin screw towboat, b. 1980 by Acadiana Shipbldg. Corp., New Iberia, La. 60 x 24.  Cummins KTA19-M3 diesels, repowered 2008. 1200 hp.  Twin Disc red.  5:1. Orig. VICKIE MARIE C, operated by C. Craft Marine Services, Inc., Golden Meadow, La.  Sold 1988, renamed by Carline's Geismar Fleet, Inc., Gonzales, La.

OFFICIAL #:
624433
HOME PORT:
NEW ORLEANS, LA
OWNED BY:
PPF
ON CHARTER BY:
N/A
CALL SIGN:
WDC3184
FRN #:
0006607519
LICENSE ID#:
L00514145
MMSI #:
367003620
YEAR BUILT:
1980
ENGINE TYPE:
(2) KTA 19 M3
MFG. HP RATING:
1200
RIVERMAN'S HP RATING:
1200
REDUCTION GEAR RATIO:
5:1
REPOWERED:
2008
FUEL CAPACITY:
10,846 GAL
GROSS TONS:
90
NET TONS:
61
LENGTH:
56
BREADTH:
23
DEPTH:
7.5
OPERATING CREW:
2 - 6

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CSS Tennessee , a 1273-ton ironclad ram, was built at Selma, Alabama. Launched in February 1863, her outfitting was completed at Mobile, where she was commissioned in February 1864. As flagship of Admiral Franklin Buchanan , she was by far the strongest unit of the naval part of the defenses of Mobile Bay. To counter her, the Federal Navy had to bring ironclad monitors to the Gulf of Mexico.

On 5 August 1864, Tennessee battled against Rear Admiral David Glasgow Farragut's fleet as it steamed past Forts Morgan and Gaines into Mobile Bay. Though she was able to inflict some damage on the Federal ships, Farragut successfully entered the Bay and anchored beyond the reach of the Confederate forts' guns. Admiral Buchanan then took his ship up toward the Union warships, engaging them in an intense battle that ended with Tennessee surrounded by her enemies and battered into surrender.

The former Confederate ironclad was promptly taken into the Union Navy as USS Tennessee . With her combat damage quickly repaired, she was employed during operations to capture Fort Morgan later in August. In the autumn of 1864, Tennessee was sent to New Orleans, Louisiana, for further repairs. She subsequently served with the U.S. Navy's Mississippi Squadron until after the end of the Civil War. Decommissioned in August 1865, USS Tennessee was sold for scrapping in November 1867. 


CSS Virginia

Twin screw towboat, b. 1998 by Kody Marine, Inc., Harvey, La.  72 x 28.  Cummins KTA38-MO diesels, 1700 hp.  Twin Disc red.  6.39:1.  Kort nozzles. Operated by Carline's Geismar Fleet, Inc., Gonzales, La.

OFFICIAL #:
1064520
HOME PORT:
NEW ORLEANS, LA
OWNED BY:
CSSV
ON CHARTER BY:
N/A
CALL SIGN:
WDC3185
FRN #:
0006607519
LICENSE ID#:
L00514145
MMSI #:
367003630
YEAR BUILT:
1998
ENGINE TYPE:
(2) KTA 38 CUMMINS
MFG. HP RATING:
1700
RIVERMAN'S HP RATING:
1700
REDUCTION GEAR RATIO:
6.39:1
REPOWERED:
2011
FUEL CAPACITY:
24,000 GAL
GROSS TONS:
140
NET TONS:
112
LENGTH:
72
BREADTH:
28
DEPTH:
10.4
OPERATING CREW:
2 - 6

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On 20 April 1861, when Virginia authorities took over the Norfolk Navy Yard after its evacuatuation by Federal forces, they found, among other valuable items, the hulk of the steam frigate USS Merrimack . Though burned to the waterline and sunk, the big ship's lower hull and machinery were intact. During the remainder of 1861 and the first two months of 1862, the Confederate States Navy raised, drydocked and converted her into a casemate ironclad ram, a new warship type that promised to overcome the Union's great superiority in conventional warships. Placed in commission as CSS Virginia in mid-February 1862, the ship's iron armor made her virtually invulnerable to contemporary gunfire. She carried ten guns of her own, a seven-inch pivot-mounted rifle at each end and a broadside battery of two six-inch rifles and six nine-inch smoothbores. Affixed to her bow was an iron ram, allowing the ship herself to be employed as a deadly weapon.

Virginia made her first combat sortie on 8 March 1862, steaming down the Elizabeth River from Norfolk and into Hampton Roads. In a historic action that dramatically demonstrated the superiority of armored steam-powered warships over their wooden sailing counterparts, she rammed and sank the big U.S. Navy sloop of war Cumberland and shelled the frigate Congress into submission. In Washington, D.C., many of the Federal Government's senior officials panicked, convinced that Virginia posed a grave threat to Union seapower and coastal cities. They were unaware that her serious operational limitations, caused by her deep draft, weak powerplant and extremely poor seakeeping, essentially restricted her use to deep channels in calm, inland waterways.

However, their worries were relieved the next day. When Virginia returned to Hampton Roads to attack the grounded steam frigate USS Minnesota, she found the Union's own pioneer ironclad, USS Monitor, waiting. A second historic battle ensued, with the two opponents firing away, without mortal effect, until the action ended in a tactical draw in the early afternoon of 9 March 1862.

Over the next two months, the two ironclads kept each other in check. Virginia , repaired and strengthened at the Norfolk Navy Yard, reentered the Hampton Roads area on 11 April and 8 May, but no further combat with the Monitor resulted. As the Confederates abandoned their positions in the Norfolk area, Virginia was threatened with the loss of her base. After a futile effort to lighten the ship enough to allow her to move up the James River, on 11 May the South's formidible ironclad was destroyed by her crew off Craney Island, some six miles from where she had electrified the World through her battles of 8 and 9 March. CSS Virginia 's wreck was largely removed between 1866 and 1876.